Origin of English word CRANK

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English Word

CRANK

Edenic Word

QeRaKH

Hebrew Word

קרך

Transliteration

Koof-Resh-Khaf

Pronounciation

KERR-akh

Conversion

[KRK → KRNK]

Roots

1. A CRANK (handle to turn or wind) or to CRANK involves moving with a circular motion. The AHD offers the Indo-European “root” ger- 2 (curving, crooked). They cite an Old English crank-staef as a weaving implement. The CRANK is a nasalized form of the Aramaic-Syriac   קרך   KRaKH (he bound round, wrapped, surrounded). Akkadian karraku is to wrap. Aramaic  KaRKA is used for surrounding a city with a wall. These other Semitic terms are necessary because the Bible only has, in Esther 8:15, the winding around referring  to a royal Eastern robe.

2. Many definitions involving CRANK are about a bend or to bend. The guttural-liquid-guttural of CRA(N)K could be from a metathesis of   עקל GHaQeL (crooked – see ANKLE) with a liquid shift.


Branches

The alleged Indo-European “root” is too vague, more than off target. For it’s Edenic equivalent see CURVE.  Of the guttural-liquid-guttural listed cognates of CRANK,  CRINGLE, CREEK, CROCHET and CROOK (hook) are more related to the winding here.  More KRK surroundings at CURB. 

When someone is CRANKY they are bent out of shape, like the nautical usage when a ship is imbalanced. The crooked sense of Ayin-Koof-Lamed thus speaks to German krank (ill).


Related Words

CURVE



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