Origin of English word DECAY

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English Word

DECAY

Edenic Word

DiK[H]eeY

Hebrew Word

דחי

Transliteration

Dalet-Het-Yod

Pronounciation

DE-KHEE

Conversion

[D-KH-Y]

Meaning

fall or accident

Roots

DECAY is traced to Latin decidere (to fall down, fall away). This term is from de (down) + cadere (to fall), and the Indo-European “root” kad (to fall).

דחי   DiK[H]eeY means fall or ACCIDENT;   דחי DeK[H]eeY is translated "stumbling" in Psalms116:8. The D and K, dental and guttural,  reverse from Edenic ד - ח  Dalet-Het to KD "fall" words of English.  An Edenic word with the same KD sequence is  קדה QaDaH and קדד    QaDahD

  is to bow down (Genesis 23:7).   In Akkadian qadadu is to incline.  Greek kata means down;Hittite katta does too; all three, and the Latin  cadere (to fall) are reversals of    תחת TaK[H]aT (down, below, under – Genesis 1:7 – see SOUTH.


Branches

Cognates of DECAY under Indo-European kad (to fall) include ACCIDENT, CADAVER, CADENCE, CADENT, CASCADE, CASE, CHANCE, CHUTE, DECADENCE, DECIDUOUS, ESCHEAT, INCIDENT, OCCASION and RECIDIVISM.

Dentals D and T are interchangeable, yet the AHD does not link their root kad (to fall) root with their root kat- 1 (something thrown down). More significant that laboratory reconstructions, Greek kata (down) should link up with the Edenic terms above, as well as with TaK[H]AT (under, below -TK → KT). This would yield scores of  CATA- words, including CATABOLIC, CATACLYSM, CATACOMB, CATALOGUE, CATALYST, CATAPULT, CATARACT, CATATROPHE, CATHODE and CATHOLIC. At CATHOLIC the dictionary reveals a second meaning for Greek kata- completely. This recalls AKHAT (one, as in all one and the same).   The ACCENT is one’s CADENCE or fall of audible stress.  ACCENT, therefore may be a nasalized (extra N) CT or KT “fall” word, related to CADENCE.  The AHD places ACCENT under kan (to sing), a cognate with words like “chant.”


Bible Verses

Psalm 116:8 כי חלצת נפשׁי ממות את־עיני מן־דמעה את־רגלי מדחי׃

“For thou hast delivered my soul from death, mine eyes from tears, and my feet from stumbling.”


Strong

(1762)

Related Words

SOUTH



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