Origin of English word DIKE

Bookmark and Share


English Word

DIKE

Edenic Word

DaYeQ

Hebrew Word

דיק

Transliteration

Dalet-Yod-Koof

Pronounciation

DA-YAKE

Conversion

[DYK]

Meaning

siege-wall, bulwark, rampart

Roots

Old French digue is a dike; various embankments, causeways and walls are implied here beside the water walls of Holland.

DaYYeQ and DaYaiQ (of IIKings25:2andJeremiah52:4) are poorly translated as "towers" or "forts," but are correctly defined in dictionaries as a siege-wall, bulwark or rampart.


Branches

At the Indo-European “root” dhigw (to stick, fix) DIG and DITCH are cognates of DIKE. The DOG, that prolific digger and bulwark of defence, may belong here as well. Relevant Hebrew words include TeK[H]a[K]H (to loosen soil by ploughing), DeQeR (pickax), and a reversal of D(T)K  KoT(eL) (wall). See 'TACK".


Bible Verses

Jeremiah 52:4 ויהי בשׁנה התשׁעית למלכו בחדשׁ העשׂירי בעשׂור לחדשׁ בא נבוכדראצר מלך־בבל הוא וכל־חילו על־ירושׁלם ויחנו עליה ויבנו עליה דיק סביב׃

“And it came to pass in the ninth year of his reign, in the tenth month, in the tenth day of the month, that Nebuchadrezzar king of Babylon came, he and all his army, against Jerusalem, and encamped against it; and they built forts against it round about.”


Strong

(1785)



Leave a Comment


Comments are moderated and rel="nofollow" is in use. Offensive / irrelevant comments will be deleted.

 *Name

 *Email (will not be published)


 *Enter captcha code

 Website (optional)