Origin of English word FIRE

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English Word

FIRE

Edenic Word

B’[A]iRaH

Hebrew Word

בערה

Transliteration

Bhet-Ayin-Resh-Hey

Pronounciation

(HEH)-VAIR

Conversion

[ BR → FR]

Roots

The above term is Aramaic for fire; Exodus22:5 blames  HaMaBHeeYR et HaB’[A]iRaH("he who kindled the fire").  בערה   B’[A]iRaH is any kind of burning.  Old English fire is fyr; Greek is pyr andthe alleged Indo-European “root” is pur.  Semitic fire and burning is Bet-Ayin-Resh at it’s root, rather like Dutch fire: vuur – see BURN.


Branches

Official cognates of FIRE include EMPYREAL, PYRE, PYRETIC, PYRITES, PYROMANIAC, etc. Going through all the bilabials and liquids with get a wide  variety of burnings, FEVER to WRATH.

SAMOVAR, from Indo-European “root” wer (to burn), should beadded. FRYcomes via Indo-European bher (tocook, bake). Thai fire is fai; most Asian languages would drop or  not pronounce a Resh.

Aleph-Vav-Resh (fire) is related to the silent Ayin in Bhet-Ayin-Resh (to burn), while  K[H]aRaH (to burn  – see  CHAR) ties in to the guttural Ayin which is added to  Resh.

Change the BR → BL to get BLAZE, FUEL, FLAME or Finnish pala (to burn). Switch the end L with the middle guttural to see FLAGRANT, CONFLAGRATION, EFFULGENT, PHLEGM, and PHLOX. These last six words, along with BLUE, FLAVIN, BLAZE, BLANK, BLUSH, BLACK, FLAME, FLAMINGO and more, all are credited to the IE “root” bhel-1 (to shine, flash, burn). FURY is a FIERY emotion. FURIOUS and INFURIATE are related (the fire/anger equation is reinforced ar IRE.   Reverse the LB of LaBaH (flame, Exodus 3:2) and L’HaBHah (flame, Obadiah 1:18). – see BLAZE.

Dutch vuur and German Feuer are FIRE words that easily come from  HeBH[E]R. Slavic fire prefers  K[H]AM (heat), as in Russian agon. Basque reverses the principle Hebrew fire term - using su instead of AiS(H). Arabic nar (fire) is related to NaiR (light or lamp – see MINARET).        See BURN and LIGHT.


Related Words

WRATH



David   3/6/2013 7:36:00 PM
Consider this root instead, the Hebrew root SRF, which means burn. Its that same root in the word Serpent, which makes it not an ordinary snake but a fiery one. Now the word fire just lost the S letter and kept the R and F in reverse. You get (F)i(R)e from S(R)(F).

sexylin123   9/21/2012 5:42:00 AM
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