Origin of English word HERD

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English Word

HERD

Edenic Word

(G)HayDeR

Hebrew Word

עדר

Transliteration

Ayin-Dalet-Resh

Pronounciation

AID-ere

Conversion

[GH-D-R → (G)H-R-D]

Roots

Old Norse hjord (herd) opens with an H, but Sanskrit cardha (flock, herd, troop) and the Indo-European “root” kerdh (row, herd) again establish a guttural origin for an English H word.

עדר GHayDeR is a flock, herd or 'drove' (Genesis32:17); a metathesis of the #2 and #3 root letters allows GH-D-R to be read GH-R-D.  Drop the guttural beginning and you have HERD. Other examples of   ע   Ayin (GH) becoming just H are at HYPER and  SEROW.    ע-ד Ayin-Dalet is a subroot of gathering and adding, see GATHER and :ADD.”  A herd of humans is an עדה      GHayDaH  (assembly, congregation – Exodus 12:3).


Branches

COWHERD, HERDSMAN, SHEPHERD and SWINEHERD all flock together.

  Genesis32 shows why a 'row' (orderly arrangement) is an appropriate second definition for the Indo-European “root” of HERD. The word ORDER may ultimately relate to  [A]iDeR (flock) and to $ayDeR (order, arrangement). These two Hebrew terms are identical but for the initial letters - which are consecutive in the Hebrew alphabet. See SIDEREAL. The DR or RD sub-root here appears in  DT-OO-R (row, column) – see TIER.

Other possibly related English terms include HUDDLE (a crowd – shift Liquids from R to L), CRO(W)D (the W is unhistoric – M1-3-2 and the Guttural  hardens), and CATTLE (presently thought to be from 'head' terms like Latin caput – all root letters shift, but the sequence remains).  A large, unruly HERD of two-legged animals is a HORDE (same in German). HORDE has o Indo-European “root.” One guess is Turkish ordi, a camp, although the word infers a herd-like drive, rather than the stationary order of a camp.

[A]iDeR or GHaiDeR is dissectable into two meaning elements (as are all three-letter Hebrew roots). 1) The Ayin-Dalet element, as in [A]iDaH or GHaiDaH means (assembly, community). 2) The Dalet-Resh (DR) element recalls both  DeeYR and  GiDaYRaH, meaning 'sheepfold.'

The Spanish herd, hato, drops the end-Resh. Typical of some of the Babel-Babel in Slavic, there is  an M231  metathesis,  a dental shift and an added Z, as Polish  עדר “herd” is trzoda.


Related Words

SEROW



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