Origin of English word HITCH

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The word HITCH is addressed in the entry: CATCH


English Word

CATCH

Edenic Word

QOATS

Hebrew Word

קוץ

Transliteration

Koof-Vav-Tsadi

Pronounciation

COATS

Conversion

[K-TS]

Roots

After Middle English catchen, the given etymons get caught up in words with different sounds (coming from different Hebrew sources). Old Norman French cacheris from    קח QahK[H] (take!), while Latin capere (to take) and the Indo-European “root” kap (to grasp) are from   חפן   ן   K[H]aPHaN (handful – see FIN) and/or     כף KahPH (hand – see CUFF).          ,

 To CATCH is 1) to seize and hold and 2) to trap and snare. The verses below catch these with definitions  of  קוץ QOATS :

Genesis3:18 --  "Thorns also and thistles shall it bring forth to thee." (There will always be a CATCH in all our en­deavors.)  Isaiah29:21 -- "Who cause men to lose their lawsuits, laying a snare for the arbiter at the gate. . . "

    מוקש MoaQaiSH is a snare.( Exodus 10:7).   See CATCH.    נוקש   NOAQaiSH is “snared” in Psalms 9:17.  Harkavy adds the meaning “seduced” in Deuteronomy 12:30.  An M132 metathesis in  a related word might be  נשק  NaQeSH (to kiss) – at least with the wrong lips.


Branches

QOATS might also be the source of HITCH. HITCH is to catch as if entangled. (The Koof/Q to H change is common – see "head" or "heat."  A  Japanese thorn is toge .  More guttural-dental cutters at ACUTE and CUT.

See ACACIA.





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