Origin of English word KENNING

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The word KENNING is addressed in the entry: KNOW


English Word

KNOW

Edenic Word

GHaYaiN

Hebrew Word

עין

Transliteration

Ayin-Yod-Noon

Pronounciation

Ghah-YAIN

Conversion

[GH-N → KN (+W)]

Roots

The Indo-European “root” of the verb to KNOW is gno (to know).  The “W” is extra baggage. Old English cnawan (to know) came from a GN root, as confirmed by the Edenic.  The cognate IGNORE indicates that the root is about regarding, not merely cognition.  This visual component, and seeing is believing, confirming and knowing, is seen in the noun [A]YiN or GHaYin (eye – Genesis 3:7 – where Adam and Eve’s eyes open for KNOWLEDGE, not for mere sight.  The verb GHaYaiN (to see) already means “to perceive, consider, meditate” in Ugaritic and Aramaic-Syriac (EDK).


Branches

Some of the better cognates listed here include CAN, CONNOISSEUR,CUNNING, KEN, KENNING (see “KENNING”), IGNORANT and, from a proposed Greek root gigno-skein (to know, think), AGNOSIA, DIAGNOSIS, GNOME, GNOMON, GNOSIS, PATHOGNOMIC, PHYSIOGNOMY and PROGNOSIS.

The guttural Ayin plus Noon gives Japanese many “KN” words of both seeing and knowing, such as kanko (sightseeing), kan’nen (idea, sense), and kansatsu (observe, watch). See EYE.





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