Origin of English word LACUNA

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The word LACUNA is addressed in the entry: CATSKILL


English Word

CATSKILL

Edenic Word

NaK[H]ahL

Hebrew Word

נחל

Transliteration

Noon-Het-Lamed

Pronounciation

(NA)-khull

Conversion

[(N)-K( H)-L]

Meaning

stream, ravine, wadi

Roots

Kill is a stream, channel, or creek term that appears in placenames like the Catskill mountains and Peekskill, NY. The Middle Dutch kille has no known origin.

(Na)K[H]aL is a stream, ravine or "wadi" ( I Kings17:7). Almost a score of Biblical placenames include this term.  The built-in sound-alike synonym of    נחל NaK[H]aL (stream) is a   נהל NaHaR (river – Isaiah 6:12 – see INERT.


Branches

COULEE, CULVERT, GHYLL, GILL, GULCH and GULLY may all relate. Kali means river in Indonesian; kaeul is a stream in Korean.  Reverse KL and shift liquids, L to R, for the Ukrainian river: rika.

Soften the Het / K[H] and substitute the L for an R for Na[K]HaL (stream, wadi) to reveal the closely related  NaHaR (river, stream). Rivers from the Nile to the Rhine now come into view (as NR becomes NL or reverses its flow to become RN). Read NHR as the harsher NGR and you may hear the ANGARA River in Siberia and the Niagara River of New York and Ontario.  The Hey/ H of NaHaR (river) can drop out or shift to a harsher guttuiral, so Niagra, Nile (add a liquid shift of Resh/R to L) or NHR-reversed RHINE and RHONE rivers may all flow from the Biblical river, Noon-Hey-Resh.

The CLOACA ( urinary tract, from the Latin for sewer) may be from  QoLaK[H] (to stream, spurt or pour out – seen in a word for a water boiler in I Samuel 2:14).  (Hay)LeKH is flowing;  LayKH means "go!"  (Pe)LeG is a stream.

As seen in NOSE from NoZeL (to pour – see “NASAL”), bodily spurters are often linked to Edenic words that are not anatomical. The Greek nose, rhinos, gets us back to a reversed NaHaR -- more at INERT.

The given source of LEAK and LACK and one of the possible sources of LAKE, Indo-European “root” leg (to trickle), is related to Hebrew terms like  (Qo)LaK[H] (to stream) and LaK[H] (moist). Otherwise, LACUNA (ditch, hole, pool), LAGOON (see LAGOON), LAKE and LOCH connect to Hebrew words like LoaGH (crater), RaiQ (empty) and (a reverse of) K[H]aL(aL) (hollow – see HOLLOW).


Bible Verses

I Kings 17:7 ויהי מקץ ימים וייבשׁ הנחל כי לא־היה גשׁם בארץ׃

“And it came to pass after a while, that the brook dried up, because there was no rain in the land.”


Strong

(5158)

Related Words

LAGOON



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