Origin of English word MARINE

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English Word

MARINE

Edenic Word

MahR

Hebrew Word

מר

Transliteration

Mem-Resh

Pronounciation

MAR

Conversion

[MR]

Roots

The English derivatives of מר MahR (bitter – Isaiah 5:20) are revealed when noting that the MARASCHINO cherry comes from Latin amarus (bitter tasting). מרי     MiReeYReeY ("bitter" in Deuteronomy32:24) is rendered amarus by the Latin concordance. MARINADE and MARINATE leads one to MARINE words of the briny sea, as these food-soaking terms are from Spanish marino (briny and marine).

The "bitter" water of the Bible can now be understood to mean unsweet, undrinkable, saline or sea water encountered by the Israelites in Exodus 15:23. The     מים   MaYiM (water) is   מרים MaRiM (briny… source for “the brine” or the saltwater sea).

In the divine engineering of Edenics, this biter nasal-liquid (Mem-Resh) root is the built-in opposite of the sweet Mem-Lamed root seen at MOLASSES.   A nasal shift away,  נרד   NaiRD the fragrant plant of Songs 1:12, is also an opposite.       מר

Moar (MYRRH --  Exodus 30:23) made fragrant oil, but it did taste bitter.


Branches

מר M-R salt water brings us to the first desalinization plant in recorded history— the tree cast into the "bitter" (MaRiM) waters of   מרה Marah to make them "sweet" - Exodus15:23-25.

  מרים MIRIAM is Moses' sister.  Her name, the mother of names like MARY and nouns like MARIONETTE and MARIGOLD, translates as "briny sea."

The IE “root” mori (body of water...sea) takes in MARE, MARINARA, MARINA, MARINE, MARITIME, MARSH, MEERSCHAUM, MERE, MERMAID, ORMER and SUBMARINE.

Sea is mer in French, Meer in German and Afrikaans, morze in Polish, morye in Russian, and similar in the other Romance, Germanic and Slavic tongues. The Welsh sea is mor.  MORELLO is another "bitter" term from Latin amarus (bitter). MORULA, MURREY and MULBERRY are cognates at Indo-European “root” moro (blackberry). מר MahR (bitter) should be the ultimate etymon.

Hamar is poured water in Arabic; related to an MR term rendered "torrents" or "floods" or "watery pit" in Psalms140:11.

MOOR (marsh) is not traced to Indo-European mori. It is linked instead to the Indo-European “root” ma (damp). This and another Indo-European “root”, meu (damp-given source of LITMUS, MIRE, MOSS, MUST and MUSTARD), are related to מיא MaYAh (water - Aramaic), מים   MahY iM (waters - Genesis1:2) and MaY (the waters of). Reverse to ים YaM (ocean), while מר MahR means "drop" in Isaiah40:15. Umi is sea in Japanese; muyu is bath in Chinese; yam is a drink in Cantonese. A Japanese ill feeling or hostility reverses MaR to urami.

MARGARET and MARGUERITE ("pearl" words of uncertain origin) can now be understood to mean a GaRGeR (berry, pill) from the MR (sea).

See GRAIN for a breakdown of MARGARINE.

Back to the bitter taste of Mem-Resh and then Latin amarus (bitter), the M-R of Latin morus (mulberry) shifted to M-L in the bitter-sweet MULBERRY.  MULBERRY in Modern Greek is moura.  Among the 59 dialects of Malay, the most popular word for “sour”  is marino and several Grims’ Law variations of M-R.

See emotional bitterness at MOROSE.   MARMALADE and more bitter tastes at MYRTLE.


Related Words

MYRTLE



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