Origin of English word PUERILE

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English Word

PUERILE

Edenic Word

PeRa[K]H

Hebrew Word

פרח

Transliteration

Pey-Resh-Het

Pronounciation

PER-(AH)

Conversion

[PR]

Roots

PUERILE (childish) is from Latin puer (child), thought to come from a fabricated Indo-European “root” pau (few, little – see   PAUCITY). PeeR[K]HaH is a youth (Job30:12); התפרכה     HeeTPaR[K]HaH is to become puerile or infantile. אפרח EPHRoah[K]H (Deuteronomy 22:6) is a chick or birdling;   פרח PeRa[K]H is a youth, cadet or trainee;   עפר [O]aPHeR is a young of deer;   כפיר  K'PHeeYR is the built-in opposite, the young of predators, usually a young lion.   פרג PahRahG is a sprout and to sprout. The פ-ר  Pey-Resh in the young of animals is treated at CAPRICORN.


Branches

Switching to BR from Pey-Resh,  [O]OBahR is a fetus and  BaR is a son (Aramaic). The more sensible cognates of PUERILE are FOAL (colt), FILLY, PONY, PUERPERAL, and PULLET.  See PULLET, from PeRa[K]H.  Not listed was FILS (son or youth - from French) or AFFILIATE (Middle Latin affiliare is to "take to oneself as a son"). Perhaps a more obvious omission is PARR (the young of fish). A Maya Indian dad called his son pal (son); reverse PL for lapsi (a Finnish child). Greek pallax is a youth. 

More young chicks from Phey-Resh at PULLET.


Related Words

PULLET



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